https://

Part 6 – Conclusion

In this conclusion there is a summary of the points covered in ‘Identifying Reading and Writing Problems’ and the recommendations for intervention.

Part 6: Conclusion

In conclusion:

  • Find out the reading and spelling ages of children who have just transferred from another school, particularly those who are poor at reading, writing and spelling.
  • Assess the gaps in these children’s letter-sound knowledge and their skills of blending, segmenting and writing.
  • Share the results with the child’s parents or guardians.
  • Explain the type of intervention that is proposed and ask the parents or guardians whether they will be able to support their child.
  • Provide homework when appropriate and adjust the amount, according to the response from the child and the parents.
  • Write the homework in a book and encourage the parents to report back any problems.
  • Aim to achieve a three-fold improvement, or more, on standardised reading and spelling tests.
  • Aim to stop children from guessing unknown words.
  • Be aware that these children will have invariably been taught using mixed methods. They will more than likely be guessing words due to insufficient letter-sound knowledge, rather than decoding all through the word from left to right.
  • Remember that – in the beginning –  most reading problems are word identification problems. Comprehension usually improves when the children can read words easily.

And that concludes the teaching on this section.

  • Letter-Sound Knowledge - Steps 1 - 3

    Print the first sheet and ask the child to say the sounds for the letters, recording any that are not known. Some letters represent more than one sound, which the child should also know. The second and third sheets provide guidance for these alternative sounds.

  • Letter-Sound Knowledge - Steps 1 - 3 - print letters

    Print the first sheet and ask the child to say the sounds for the letters, recording any that are not known. Some letters represent more than one sound, which the child should also know. The second and third sheets provide guidance for these alternative sounds.

  • Letter-Sound Knowledge - Steps 4 - 5

    Print the first sheet and ask the child to say the sounds for the letters, recording any that are not known. Some letters represent more than one sound, which the child should also know. The second and third sheets provide guidance for these alternative sounds.

  • Letter-Sound Knowledge - Steps 4 - 5 - print letters

    Print the first sheet and ask the child to say the sounds for the letters, recording any that are not known. Some letters represent more than one sound, which the child should also know. The second and third sheets provide guidance for these alternative sounds.

  • Tricky Words - Steps 3 - 6

    Print this sheet and ask the children to read the tricky words, recording any that are not known. Use dictation to find out how well they can spell them.

  • Tricky Words - Steps 3 - 6 - print letters

    Print this sheet and ask the children to read the tricky words, recording any that are not known. Use dictation to find out how well they can spell them.

  • Suitable words for testing the skill of blending

    These words are not frequently read by young children, so they are suitable for testing how well a child can blend unknown words. The words start with letter sounds the children learnt initially and progress to the more unusual letter sounds in Step 5.